PacPrint 2017


PacPrint17-1

The digital revolution of the last 30 years has radically changed the way printing is done and what is printed. There is no easier way to track the changes than by regularly attending a print industry trade show like PacPrint 2017 (23–26 May, Melbourne Exhibition Centre), which is held every four years. Read More...

Tricks of the strong imagination

Immortal shakespeare

When Shakespeare was composing Richard III, he relied heavily on Sir Edmund de Fraude’s memoir The Kinge and I (1488), which was still available during the Bard’s day, in French translation, as Le roi et moi. Richard III trusted very few, so it fell on Sir Edmund (1447–1502) to serve his king as both valet cum butler and second in battle.
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New edition of ‘Lyrebird’ has 340+ images

Lyrebird Blog-1


Producing the new eBook edition of Barry Kitcher’s popular memoir From Gaolbird to Lyrebird—a life in Australian ballet (BryshaWilson Press, 2016), enabled us to include not only the photos that didn’t make it into the hard print first edition (Front Page, 2001) but also several hundred other images from Kitcher’s private collection of photographs, programmes and scrapbooks.
In fact, the eBook has over 340 images, compared with around 100 in the 2001 printed book.
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New Name for New Book


The-Muse-of-the-Maze


When we approached author Larry Buttrose for the publishing rights to re-issue his novel
The Maze of the Muse—originally published in 1998 by Flamingo, an imprint of HarperCollins—as an eBook, he revisited the manuscript and revised it extensively. The result is a distinctly new book but because we initially kept its original name, the eBook was being confused with the old paperback. To distinguish the new from the old, the eBook is now renamed The Muse of the Maze. Read More...

BryshaWilson Press — The Muse of the Maze


The-Muse-of-the-Maze


Hitch-hiking young tourists assailed by a ‘truly woeful Eagles tape’ and trapped in an ancient Merc carrying an impressive haul of hash and coke across the border of France and Spain, does not sound like the stuff of a literary adventure undertaken to meet a highly-regarded poet and man of letters. However, it sure smacks of the 1970s and as such, it deftly evokes the era in which young Australian poet Jack Driscoll sets out on an odyssey to Deya, Mallorca to meet literary titan Robert Graves and obtain a poet’s blessing from him. The unfolding surprise of the unexpected is one of the most striking qualities of Larry Buttrose’s novel
The Muse of the Maze (BryshaWilson Press, Melbourne, 2016, eBook). The other is the delicately modulated prose delivered as a first person narrative by Jack, who assumes the dual role of major player and observer as his story unfolds. Read More...